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Nebraska Crime Commission

Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice

Grants

Community-based Juvenile Services

Community-based Juvenile Services Aid (CB/EB)

The Community-based Juvenile Services Aid Division is a separate and distinct budgetary program within the Crime Commission, managed by the Community-based Juvenile Services Aid Division Chief, Cynthia Kennedy. Funding acquired by communities through participation in this grant program is used to aid in the establishment and provision of community-based services for juveniles who come in contact with the juvenile justice system.

Forms

JAG

The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program allows states and local governments to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime and to improve the criminal justice system. JAG funds may be used for state and local initiatives, technical assistance, strategic planning, research and evaluation, data collection, training, personnel, and criminal justice information systems that will improve such areas as:

  • Law Enforcement Programs
  • Prosecution and Court Programs
  • Prevention and Education Programs
  • Corrections and Community Corrections Programs
  • Drug treatment and Enforcement Programs
  • Planning, Evaluation, and Technology Improvement Programs
  • Crime Victim and Witness Programs (other than compensation)

Evidence-based Programs

Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) encourages programs that are evidence-based and have been proven effective. Questions often arise about what is meant by evidence-based programs. Office of Justice Programs (OJP) considers programs and practices to be evidence-based when their effectiveness has been demonstrated by causal evidence (generally obtained through one or more outcome evaluations).

2012-2015 JAG Strategic Plan

2012-2015 JAG Strategic Plan Addendum

Forms

JRJ

John R. Justice Student Loan Repayment Program (JRJ)

The John R. Justice Student Loan Repayment Program is a new federal program that will be administered by the Nebraska Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice. The purpose of the program is to encourage lawyers to enter and be retained as full-time public defenders and public criminal prosecutors. Selected public prosecutors and defenders will receive educational loan repayments if they promise to remain as a public prosecutor or defender in Nebraska for at least three years.

The number of awards made through this program, as well as the individual dollar amount awarded, is subject to sufficient annual appropriations by the federal government.

Eligibility Requirements:

  1. Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen
  2. Local state or federal defenders and local and state prosecutors employed full-time in Nebraska. Federal prosecutors are not eligible
  3. Not in default on an educational loan
  4. Awardees may move between public defender and public prosecutor but may not move to the private sector
  5. Must have eligible loans (see below)
  6. Priority will be given to lawyers with high debt-to income ratios.
  7. The federal law requires the recipient to work full-time as either a public prosecutor or a public defender. The borrower must continue to make regular payments to their lender during the service period. The loan repayment from this program can not be a substitute for the borrower’s payment to the lender.
  8. Continually licensed to practice law in Nebraska.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the Program Purpose?
A: The purpose of this program is to encourage qualified individuals to enter and continue employment as prosecutors and public defenders
Q: When can I apply for funds?
A: The date for the posting of the RFP is yet to be determined. Check the NCC website often.
Q: When will my application be due?
A: The application deadline will be clearly stated in the RFP once it is posted. Check NCC website often.
Q: How much time will I have to apply once the RFP is posted?
A: The open application period will be clearly stated in the RFP once it is posted.
Q: How will my application be evaluated?
A: The Act contains very specific criteria for awarding JRJ grants. It requires the applicant’s “ability to pay” educational obligations be considered first and foremost. In keeping with the federal mandate, each application will be evaluated by NCC staff and the JRJ Advisory Committee. The NCC Board will make the final award decisions and NCC staff will notify successful applicants.
Q: Are there tax consequences associated with accepting an award through the JRJ Program?
A: According to the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), awards may be taxable to recipients. The NCC will issue an IRS 1099-MISC form to each recipient of funds and also file the 1099-MISC form. The 1099-MISC form is used to report miscellaneous income that does not fall in the category of salary, wages or tips. For additional information and guidance on tax consequences associated with the JRJ Program, please consult the IRS or a tax advisor.
Q: If I am selected for an award, will I receive a check for the amount?
A: No. The JRJ Program requires awards to be paid directly to the loan servicer/lender. In the case of multiple loans, NCC will disburse funds directly to the servicer/lender identified by the award recipient.
Q: If I am selected for an award, when will the money be disbursed?
A: As this is the first year for the JRJ Program, we are still unsure as to the exact timeline for disbursement of funds. We anticipate disbursing funds directly to the servicer/lender as soon as the successful applicant submits the post-award paperwork, including:
  • The original signed Service Agreement.
  • A completed W-9 form (required to authorize the NCC to pay the servicer/lender).
  • Designation of which lender/servicer to pay.
Q: If I am selected for an award, will I be able to renew the award next year?
A: As originally envisioned, this year’s award recipients will receive priority for renewal of awards next year and the year after (years two and three of the program). To renew benefits, an award recipient will not need to execute an additional service agreement or pledge more than the initial three years of service. However, the JRJ Program is subject to federal appropriation, and as such, awards in future years are subject to the availability of funds.
Q: If I am selected for an award, and I switch jobs in the next year, how will that affect my eligibility?
A: It depends. To receive a JRJ award, you will have to execute the three-year service agreement required by BJA. If you fail to complete the three-year requirement, you are subject to the penalty provisions contained in the service agreement. If your job change maintains your eligibility (ex: Douglas County prosecutor to Lancaster County prosecutor), you will still receive priority for renewal of benefits in years two and three of the JRJ Program.
Q: I work in Douglas County but live in Lancaster County. Which county should I use for the application?
A: Please list your county of residence on the application, even if you work in another county.
Q: Where can I obtain my “Student Access Financial Aid Review”? How long does it take?
A: Your Student Access Financial Aid Review is available online at www.nslds.ed.gov. Access to this information requires a PIN, which can be obtained from this website. Plan ahead to ensure you have time to obtain the PIN before the application deadline.
Q: The application asks for the number of dependents in my household. Who can I claim?
A: Anyone claimed on your prior year tax return (Form 1040) qualifies. If you have had a life change since last year and need to claim additional dependents, please explain in the appropriate section.
Q: The income stated on my Form 1040 is no longer reflective of my household situation. Can I request consideration of my current household income?
A: Yes. If there has been a significant change in income since you filed your Form 1040, please explain in the appropriate space on the application. Additional documentation may be required.
Q: Can my employer submit the “employer verification” form directly to NCC?
A: No. Please submit the employer verification form with your completed application packet. Do not ask your employer to submit this form separately.
Q: Do I have to include information about my spouse’s student loan obligations?
A: No. However, if you would like us to consider the amount your spouse is required to pay in addition to your minimum payment, please include information about your spouse’s loans and any required documentation.
Q: What documentation do I need to provide to verify my educational debts?
A:
  • For educational debt in the name of the applicant:
    • Regardless of whether the loan qualifies for the JRJ Program, a “Student Access Financial Aid Review” for the applicant MUST be included in the application packet.
    • A lender statement must be provided for all loans that qualify for the JRJ Program. The lender statement must:
      • Be recent (last two months).
      • Show that the loan is not in default.
      • Include the original balance, current balance, and minimum monthly payment amounts.
    • If the loan does NOT qualify under the JRJ Program, no lender statement is required.
  • For educational debt in the name of a spouse:
    • No lender statement is required. However, if you would like this debt considered as part of the debt-to-income ratio of the household, please include a "Student Access Financial Aid Review" report for this person in the JRJ Program application.
Q: Do I need to include attachments to the Form 1040?
A: No. The Form 1040 is sufficient by itself. If more information is needed to evaluate your application, we will contact you.
Eligibility
Q: What types of employment qualify under the JRJ Program?
A: Prosecutor—full-time employee of a state or unit of local government (including tribal government) who is continually licensed to practice law and prosecutes criminal or juvenile delinquency cases at the state or unit of local government level (including supervision, education, or training of other persons prosecuting such cases). Prosecutors who are employees of the federal government are not eligible.

Public Defender—an attorney who is continually licensed to practice law and is a full-time employee of a state or unit of local government (including tribal government) who provides legal representation to indigent persons in criminal or juvenile delinquency cases including supervision, education, or training of other persons providing such representation; is a full-time employee of a nonprofit organization operating under a contract with a state or unit of local government who devotes substantially all of the employee’s full-time employment to providing legal representation to indigent persons in criminal or juvenile delinquency cases including supervision, education, or training of other persons providing such representation; or employed as a full-time federal defender attorney in a defender organization pursuant to Subsection (g) of section 3006A of Title 18, United States Code, that provides legal representation to indigent persons in criminal or juvenile delinquency cases.

NOTE: Attorneys who are in private practice and not a full-time employee of a non-profit organization, even if individually or part of a firm that is under contract with a state or court-appointed to provide public defense services, do not qualify as “public defenders” and therefore are not considered to be eligible as beneficiaries under this solicitation.

Q: I have only been with my current employer for four months, but I have two years of prior experience as a prosecutor or public defender. Am I eligible to apply?
A: Yes. The minimum service requirement of six months is an aggregate. Prior service in a qualified position may be added to your current job to meet the minimum service requirement.
Q: What is meant by “full-time” prosecutor or public defender?
A: According to BJA, full-time employment is considered “not less than 75% of a 40 hour work week.”
Q: Which loans qualify under the JRJ Program for awards?
A: Federal student loans (both FFEL and Direct loans) are eligible for assistance; however, loans in default, Parent PLUS loans, and private, commercial, or alternative student loans are not eligible.

Eligible Loans:

  1. A loan made, insured, or guaranteed under part B of subchapter IV of chapter 28 of Title 20 (Federal Family Education Loan Program);
  2. A loan made under part C or D of subchapter IV of chapter 28 of Title 20 (William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan and Federal Perkins Loans);
  3. A loan made under section 1078-3 or 1087e(g) of Title 20 (Federal consolidation loans and Federal Direct Consolidation loans, respectively).

Ineligible Loans:

  1. A loan made to the parents of a dependent student under section 428B of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1078-2).
  2. A Federal Direct PLUS Loan made to the parents of a dependent student.
  3. A loan made under section 428C or 455 (g) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1078-3 (Federal consolidation loans) and 1087e(g) (Federal Direct Consolidation loans) to the extent that such loan was used to repay a loan described in clause (1) or (2).
  4. Any loan in default.
Q: What if I have other loans that do not qualify under the JRJ Program?
A: You may include information about other educational loans in your application to be considered as part of your loan to income ratio; however, no awards will be paid on behalf of loans that do not qualify for the JRJ Program.
Q: I don’t have any qualifying loans under the JRJ Program, but I do have student loan obligations. Am I eligible for the Program?
A: No. The Act is very specific in the types of loans eligible under the JRJ Program.
Q: My spouse and I consolidated our student loans into one loan. Am I still eligible for this program?
A: It depends. If your underlying loan would have been eligible for the JRJ Program, yes; if your underlying loan would not have been eligible, no. If you have consolidated student debt with a spouse, please be sure to include information about your original debt (including information to verify that it would have qualified for the JRJ Program), your spouse’s original debt and the current balance of the consolidated loan in your JRJ application.
Q: My loans are currently classified in forbearance, not default. Am I eligible to apply?
A: Yes. Loans in forbearance or deferment are eligible. Loans in default are not.
Service Agreement
Q: Is executing the service agreement optional?
A: No. Awards will not be disbursed until the Service Agreement has been signed by the recipient. This is a requirement of the Act and not subject to modification.
Q: What happens if I leave my current employer before the three-year service agreement expires?
A: Please refer to the language of the Service Agreement:
“In the event I voluntarily leave my position as an eligible beneficiary, or in the event I am involuntarily separated for misconduct or unacceptable performance before completing the agreed upon period of service, I will be indebted to the Federal government and must reimburse the Department of Justice for the full amount of any student loan repayments made on my behalf under this service agreement. I further acknowledge that a sum equal to the amount that I am required to repay shall be recoverable by the Federal government from me (or my estate, if applicable) by such methods as are provided by law for the recovery of amounts owed to the Federal government.
Q: Where can I find the Service Agreement?
A: View JRJ Service Agreement
Q: Do I need to include the Service Agreement with my JRJ Application?
A: No. If you are selected for an award, you will need to execute the Service Agreement prior to disbursement.
Q: If I receive a JRJ award and wish to renew it next year, do I need to agree to an additional three years of service?
A: No. A beneficiary may receive renewal grants in years two and three of the Program without extending the original three-year Service Agreement.
Q: I have been employed by my office for two years. Will those years of service count towards the three-year requirement in the JRJ Service Agreement?
A: No. Time previously served does not count toward the three-year service agreement. The toll begins on the three years of service on the date the beneficiary signs the Service Agreement.

Forms

Juvenile Services

Juvenile Services Grant Funds (State Funding)

Juvenile Services Grant Funds are state funds appropriated by the Nebraska Legislature and administered by the Nebraska Crime Commission.  Availability of funds is announced on an annual basis and applications are accepted through a competitive grant process.

The purpose of these funds, as outlined in state statute, is to assist communities in the implementation and operation of programs or services identified in their comprehensive juvenile services plan, including but not limited to:  programs for assessment and evaluation, the prevention of delinquent behavior, diversion, detention, shelter care, intensive juvenile probation services, restitution, family support services, and community centers for the care and treatment of juveniles in need of services.  The Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice in conjunction with the Crime Commission develops a Three Year Plan for all juvenile justice grant funds.  Juvenile Services dollars are generally prioritized based on the needs identified in this Three Year Plan.

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OVP

Office of Violence Prevention

The Office of Violence Prevention was created to help develop, foster, promote and assess violence prevention programs in the State of Nebraska. The Office of Violence Prevention (OVP) aids privately funded organizations, local government subdivisions, and other community advocacy groups in developing proven and cutting-edge Prevention, Intervention, and Enforcement strategies and techniques. Through a competitive grants process the office of violence prevention awards $350,000 annually.

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RSAT

Residential Substance Abuse Treatment  (RSAT) Program

The Residential Substance Abuse Treatment  (RSAT) Grant Program assists states and units of local government in developing and implementing residential substance abuse treatment programs in state and local correctional and detention facilities.  RSAT programs must : 1) provide individual and group treatment for offender; 2) last between 6 to 12 months; 3) be provided in residential treatment facilities set apart from the general correctional population; and, 4) develop the inmate’s cognitive, behavioral, social, vocational, and other skills to solve the substance abuse and related problems.  In Nebraska, the RSAT funds are awarded to the Nebraska Department of Corrections who has leveraged other funding resources to establish a comprehensive treatment program for offenders prior to their being eligible for parole.  One added component to their comprehensive program is an aftercare treatment component after the offender is released.

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S.T.O.P. VAWA

S.T.O.P. Violence Against Women (VAWA) grant program

The S.T.O.P. (Services, Training, Officers, Prosecutors) grant funds are awarded to states and territories to create and enhance comprehensive, positive changes in the criminal justice system’s response to the violent crimes of domestic and intimate partner violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. Per the Violence Against Women’s Act, reauthorized in 2013, each state must allocate 25% of funding for law enforcement efforts, 25% for prosecutors, 30% for victim services (of which at least 10% must be distributed to culturally specific efforts), 5% to state and local courts, and 15% for discretionary distribution among the designated categories. In addition, 20% of the overall funding must go to meaningful sexual assault services and a maximum of 5% is allowed for prevention and education efforts.  These funds are also subject to the Prison Rape Elimination Act and supporting efforts towards states’ full compliance.  The Nebraska Crime Commission (NCC) as the State Administrating Agency (SAA) for these funds distributes support statewide through a competitive grant process. These grants are utilized to promote and coordinate community and statewide responses among and across the criminal justice system and victim advocacy organizations including medical services, mental health providers and other entities responding to the needs of victims of domestic and intimate partner violence, dating violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and stalking. For victims, these partnerships ensure that communities are leveraging resources in ways that effectively support the multitude of issues associated with violent crimes against women.

 

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SASP

Sexual Assault Services Program

The Sexual Assault Services Formula Grant Program (SASP) is the first federal funding stream solely dedicated to the provision of direct intervention and related assistance for victims of sexual assault. The SASP Formula Grant Program directs grant dollars to states and territories to assist in supporting rape crisis centers and other nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations or tribal programs that provide services, direct intervention and related assistance to victims of sexual assault.  Funds provided through SASP are designed to supplement other funding sources directed at addressing sexual assault on the state and territorial level. The Nebraska Crime Commission is the State Administrating Agency (SAA) of these funds; however, the Nebraska Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence is the pass through entity for distribution of this funding stream to sexual assault programs across the state. The SASP grant funds are earmarked to provide intervention, advocacy, accompaniment and other support services to adult, youth and child victims of sexual assault, family/household members and others that are collaterally affected by the victimization.

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Title II

Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention- Title II Grant Funds

In 1974 Congress passes the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act.  The Act requires the deinstitutionalization of status offenders and non-offenders, sight and sound separation of juvenile and adult offenders in jail and correctional settings, removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups, and an assessment of disproportionate minority contact in the juvenile justice system.  These are known as the four core requirements of the Act.  The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is the federal office designated to oversee the grant funds related to the Act.

States must be in compliance with all four requirements in order to receive the full Title II grant allocation.  Nebraska has gained full compliance and therefore receives the full amount available.  Title II is a formula grant, thus the allocation is based on a formula using the states population, juvenile population, and various other factors.  States must use these funds to gain compliance with the core requirements.  Once compliance is attained, states can focus on other issues relating to juvenile justice such as substance abuse, mental health, gangs, rural issues, education, and other related topics as identified in the state Three Year Plan. 

The Act requires each state to have a State Advisory Group to facilitate a Three Year Plan for juvenile justice grant funds and make recommendations on subsequent funding.  The Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ) is Nebraska’s State Advisory Group and makes recommendations on funding to the Nebraska Crime Commission who gives final approval for all funding. 

FORMS:

LINKS:

Juvenile Services Grant Funds (State Funding)

Juvenile Services Grant Funds are state funds appropriated by the Nebraska Legislature and administered by the Nebraska Crime Commission.  Availability of funds is announced on an annual basis and applications are accepted through a competitive grant process. 

The purpose of these funds, as outlined in state statute, is to assist communities in the implementation and operation of programs or services identified in their comprehensive juvenile services plan, including but not limited to:  programs for assessment and evaluation, the prevention of delinquent behavior, diversion, detention, shelter care, intensive juvenile probation services, restitution, family support services, and community centers for the care and treatment of juveniles in need of services. The Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice in conjunction with the Crime Commission develops a Three Year Plan for all juvenile justice grant funds.  Juvenile Services dollars are generally prioritized based on the needs identified in this Three Year Plan.

FORMS:

Three Year Plan

In order to receive federal Title II formula grant funding from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the state is required to develop a comprehensive three year plan.   

The Crime Commission is required to focus on the four core requirements of the act in their plan.  Three relate to compliance with the act:  Jail Removal, Sight and Sound Separation and Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders.  To learn more about compliance with these three requirements see the Compliance Monitoring portion of the website.  The fourth requirement is to assess and address Disproportionate Minority Contact in the Juvenile Justice System.  To learn more about the DMC initiatives please see the DMC portion of the website.  Nebraska is in compliance with all four core requirements.   Should the state at some point not be in compliance, a portion of grant funding is lost until compliance can be regained.

Link:

2014-2016 Three Year Plan

Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ)

The Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ) was established in 1982, as required by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act.  The NCJJ acts as an advisory group to the Nebraska Crime Commission, and is responsible for making recommendations for federal JJDP Act and JAIBG funding.  Additionally, the group members assist in developing the comprehensive three year plan, monitor existing juvenile justice programs and issues, and advocate to improve the system and educate others on juvenile justice issues.  Members are appointed by the Governor and represent a broad cross section of citizens and professionals.

The goal of the Coalition is to improve all aspects of the juvenile justice system in the State of Nebraska by assisting communities and the state with planning and implementation of systemic improvements, advocacy, education and recommending award of JJDP Act funds for such purposes. The purpose of the Coalition is to improve the lives and future of children, youth and families involved in the juvenile justice system.

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Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC)

What is DMC?

Disproportionate Minority Contact, or DMC, originally referred to the overrepresentation of children of minority races and cultures in confined settings, but the definition now includes the overrepresentation of minority youth at each point in the juvenile justice system.

For the most part, it is not that our systems are intentionally biased, but our systems may well be inadvertently biased.  It is vital that we begin examining how we view families and their circumstances within their unique culture.

How do we know if there is overrepresentation?

Most over representation occurs when the percent of individuals served in the system is larger than the percent in your community.  For example, if African American youth make up 5% of your community, but 30% of youth in detention are African American, then African American youth are over-represented at six times the population rate.

Why does overrepresentation occur?

Confinement vs. contact.  We have begun to look at “overrepresentation” by the number of contacts youth have with our juvenile systems.  It is clear that over-representation starts much earlier than the point when a youth is confined.  Do more minority youth commit offenses that warrant being detained?  Is it that minority youth entering the system have a longer history of juvenile offenses and are more likely to be detained?  Some might argue this, but research indicates that this isn’t the case.

Socio-economics can place an offender at a disadvantage because the family’s situation affects a variety of factors:  whether a family has legal representation, whether a parent is able to attend appointments and court hearings during daytime hours, whether the family has a phone, whether they have transportation to services and court dates.  Language barriers may also lead to certain groups being over-represented.  If a family does not understand the juvenile justice process, the individual explaining the process or an important legal document- like a summons- the youth frequently ends up further entangled in the juvenile justice system than necessary.

Why should we address this?

In 1992, Congress reauthorized the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act and substantially strengthened efforts to address over-representation of minorities in our juvenile systems.  Although Congress had originally addressed DMC in the 1988 Act, the efforts in 1992 elevated the status to a “core requirement”.  Other “core requirements” include the deinstitutionalization of status offenders, removing juveniles from adult jails and lockups, and the sight and sound separation requirement.

States (and consequently counties and cities) must remain in compliance with the DMC requirement or risk losing a portion of the State’s Formula Grant Funds.  The Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice, an advisory committee to the Nebraska Crime Commission, has an active sub-committee and part time coordinator dedicated to moving the states DMC initiatives forward.   The Mission Statement of the committee is:

To promote awareness of problems that are impacting minority youth/adolescents involved with or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system in Nebraska, and to aggressively support resolutions designed to address the problems affecting these populations.

Contact Information

Please contact the Crime Commission for the DMC Committee and Nebraska's coordinator information.

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Compliance Monitoring

The Nebraska Crime Commission is responsible for monitoring Nebraska’s compliance with the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act.  The JJDP Act is a federal law governing the incarceration of juveniles in detention and correctional facilities, including juveniles placed in a secure area or locked room of a facility or a program pursuant to public authority.

Quick Reference Guide for Jails/Lock-ups and Detention Centers

This is a Quick Reference Guide for detaining juveniles in (Urban) Adult
Jails/Lock-ups, (Rural) Adult Jails/Lock-ups, Juvenile Detention Centers,
and Court Holding Facilities.  The Guide is broken up page-by-page in
regards to whether the juvenile is a Non-Offender, a Status Offender, or a
Juvenile Delinquent.  There is also a list of definitions if you are unsure
as to what type of juvenile you are dealing with or what your facility is
classified as.  Please contact the Juvenile Compliance Montor at the Crime Commission if there
are any questions about the detention of juveniles in your facility.

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VOCA

Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) - Federal Grant Program

Established in 1988 through an amendment to the Victims of Crime Act (VOCA), Congress charged the Office of Victims of Crime (OVC) with administering the Crime Victims Fund (the Fund). The Fund supports a broad array of programs and services that focus on helping victims in the immediate aftermath of crime and continuing to support them as they rebuild their lives. The Fund is financed by fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, gifts, donations, and bequests by private parties. No portion of the Fund is supported through tax dollars. All services funded through VOCA are provided to individual crime victims at no cost to the victim. VOCA guidelines regulate that each state must allocate 10% of the Fund to serving domestic violence, 10% to sexual assault, 10% of child abuse and 10% to previously underserved victims of crime, respectively, with the remaining portion divided among victim support agencies that provide direct services. OVC distributes the Fund through formula grants, based on population in each area, to State Administrating Agencies (SAA). The Nebraska Crime Commission (NCC), as the SAA serving Nebraska, is tasked to distribute grant funds through a competitive process to organizations that provide services such as crisis intervention, emergency shelter and transportation, counseling, and criminal justice advocacy to victims of crime. In addition, the NCC provides technical assistance and oversight of all VOCA funded programs.

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